Operator trade group taking action to establish a gaming machine certification process



How would you characterize NYCE’s relationship with the Associación des Permissionarios des Juegos y Sorteos?
Sánchez:
We have signed an agreement of collaboration. The association and its members are convinced that the best way of attracting clients to its gaming areas is through proper compliance with Mexican legislation and with technical norms established for gaming machines. The association has allowed us to share this message with its members, and they have selected us to fulfill the evaluation of conformity with the norms.

What can you tell us about your relationship with GLI?
Sánchez:
GLI is our technology partner. Through our commercial agreement they have given training to our personnel and have helped us develop our methods of testing and inspection. We have frequent conversations with them about what strategies we can establish to assist all our clients that request laboratory tests in the United States and later certification in Mexico. Without a doubt, the support of GLI has contributed greatly to the development of our infrastructure of evaluation.

Are you now sanctioned by the Mexican government to be the sole certifying institution for slot machines?
Sánchez:
Yes. We have taken the appropriate steps to fully demonstrate our technical capacity with the appropriate agencies of the Mexican federal government. We have complied with international norms like ISO/IEC Guide 065 as well.

What is your projected method for inspecting and certifying gaming machines?
Sánchez:
The method of evaluation will be divided into two parts: first will be the laboratory proof needed to determine the integrity of the system (the gaming server, terminals and communication systems); and second, the inspection on site to determine that the conditions of operation are in compliance with the conditions of operation that were tried in the laboratory. If a system complies with these two terms then it will obtain the certification of NYCE.

Do you distinguish between types of machines in the certification process? Class II or Class III? Chance versus skill?
Sánchez:
We do not define nor distinguish between the types of machines. The concepts of Class II and Class III are defined in the documents of the National Indian Gaming Commission of the United States, but they do not have an effect on our jurisdiction. Therefore, we should not insist on applying such concepts to the machines that operate in Mexico. Our certification is centered on evaluating the technical characteristics established in the Mexican norms, in measuring the compliance with such specifications. We cannot emit trials and comparisons that are not defined in the norm. We do not oversee the purpose of Mexican law.

Do you now have the testing tools to confirm for both the government and the individual player that the machines yield a random draw, play in a fair manner and that they are not capable of being manipulated?
Sánchez:
The agreement with GLI has allowed us to develop our procedures of testing and inspection, and we have acquired the hardware and software necessary to carry out the testing established at the norms. We are prepared to assure through certification that the equipment works according to the specifications of such Mexican standards.

What consequences will operators face if their machines do not conform to the standards?
Sánchez:
I think that very soon gaming areas that do not have certified equipment simply will not be visited by gamblers. I think that this is the biggest punishment that there can be for an operator that does not comply with the national or international norms. Both the licensee and the players will avoid using equipment that does not comply. In addition it is likely that any new law will include an obligation to comply with the norms, and those who do not comply will then be sanctioned by the federal government.


Salvador Sánchez has been manager of certification of games and drawings for Mexico’s Normalización y Certificación Electrónica since July 2008. He has 20 years of experience in information technology, technical support, training, project management and the design and implementation of software applications. He has held management positions and directorships with several organizations, where he has been responsible for the management and administration of IT departments, including facilitating the technical training of personnel, and systems of quality management under the ISO 9000:2000 standard.