The California Nations Indian Gaming Association announced the release of its bi-annual economic impact study produced by Beacon Economics, a premier leader in economic research. Researchers at Beacon found that tribal government gaming continues to be a positive economic engine in the state of California. In 2014 California tribal government gaming generated $7.8 billion in economic output in the State.

Tribal government gaming spent $4.0 billion in goods and services which generated an
additional $3.8 billion in secondary spending by vendors that supply casinos. Tribal non-gaming operations in California—the expenditures that tribal governments make in order to provide services to the tribe and community—generated an estimated $3.3 billion in economic output in 2014.

Year after year, tribal gaming and non-gaming activities generate an increasingly positive impact on California’s labor markets. For example, in 2012, tribal gaming operations supported approximately 56,100 jobs statewide; in 2014, tribal gaming operations supported approximately 63,400 jobs statewide. In 2012, tribal non-gaming operations supported approximately 14,800 jobs statewide; in 2014, tribal non-gaming operations supported approximately 21,300 jobs statewide.

“The economic and labor impacts are felt in the local communities that surround tribal
government gaming facilities. Across the state, 90 percent of those employed by tribal
governments are non-tribal employees. Most of these facilities are in very remote and
economically depressed areas and the casinos are some of the biggest employers in their regions,” said Steve Stallings, chairman of the California Nations Indian Gaming Association. 

“The salaries and benefits provided by our members and their facilities exceed market wages for the same labor pool in the State,” Stallings added.

Regional Benefits:

In 2014, tribal casinos in Southern California generated an estimated $4.4 billion in economic output in that region. Of that total, $2.1 billion came from secondary economic effects. Of the $4.4 billion in total economic output generated, $2.8 billion represented value added to the economy of Southern California, while casinos in Southern California generated $1.8 billion in total labor income in the region.

Casinos in Northern California generated an estimated $3.2 billion in economic output in that region, of which $1.5 billion represented secondary economic effects. Of the $3.2 billion in economic output these casinos generated, $2.0 billion represented value added to the Northern California region, while $1.4 billion represented wages and earnings for Northern California workers.

“We continue to be impressed by the economic power that tribes bring to their regions as money generated in their communities significantly benefit the communities around them. A majority of employees at tribal facilities come from the immediate area”, said Susan Jensen, executive director of CNIGA. “We are looking forward to several new properties that are scheduled to come online in the next few years and are eagerly anticipating several expansion projects from tribes throughout the state. Tribal gaming operations are working tirelessly to provide new services and experiences for their patrons that will continue to generate positive economic benefits for their tribal governments and their local communities,” added Jensen.